Celebrating Hieronymus Bosch

Many may have noticed the name of Hieronymous Bosch pop up with some frequency this year – that is because 2016 is the year that marks the 500th anniversary of the eclectic artist’s death. Various events, films, exhibitions and multimedia installations have been held to mark the anniversary, however there could not be a more fitting celebration of his life than the Gemäldegalerie’s latest exhibition that opened today, Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century.

Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century at the Gemäldegalerie  © Photo: David von Becker

Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century at the Gemäldegalerie © Photo: David von Becker

Running right through until February, the exhibition will suit Bosch fans and newcomers alike and showcase many works of his and of those he influenced. Berlin’s Museum of Prints and Drawings’ (the Kupferstichkabinett) at the Kulturforum holds an impressive collection of Bosch’s drawings, many of which have not been displayed in more than 15 years and these will of course be a part of the exhibition. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the collection, not all pieces will be displayed at once, but rather two prints displayed at a time and the collection rotated through the duration of the exhibition.

Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century at the Gemäldegalerie  © Photo: David von Becker

Bosch’s drawings. Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century at the Gemäldegalerie © Photo: David von Becker

The enigmatic artist was renowned as a visionary in 15th century Netherlandish drawings and was one of the Renaissance’s most influential artists. He was notorious for his reclusive character and for not always signing his pieces, so great work from art historians has gone into identifying and preserving much of his body of work. Thanks to modern technology and preservation techniques, we can now all enjoy them on display in Berlin this winter.

he Field Has Eyes, the Forest Has Ears © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Kupferstichkabinett / Jörg P. Anders

The Field Has Eyes, The Forest Has Ears © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Kupferstichkabinett / Jörg P. Anders

Some of Bosch’s best known works will be on display including the recently restored Temptation of St. Anthony which has not been displayed in the last 150 years and and the highlight of the exhibition, St. John on Patmos, an oak panel painting with his rare signature.

John on Patmos © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie / Jörg P. Anders

St. John on Patmos © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie / Jörg P. Anders

Lucas Cranach Ä.Flügelaltar mit dem Jüngsten Gericht, copy of Hieronymus Bosch, from 1524 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie / Jörg P. Anders

Lucas Cranach Ä.Flügelaltar mit dem Jüngsten Gericht, copy of Hieronymus Bosch, from 1524 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie / Jörg P. Anders

Hieronymus Bosch and His Pictorial World in the 16th and 17th century opened today, Friday 11th November and will close on the 19th February 2017. Tickets can be purchased here online and the Gemäldegalerie is open from 10am to 6pm daily (closed Mondays), 10 am till 8pm Thursdays and 11am till 6 pm Sundays. You can find the entrance at Matthäikirchplatz at the Kulturforum next to Potsdamer Platz.

 

 


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